For Audiences

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Ballet Hispánico Caravanserai Watch Party

Ballet Hispánico Caravanserai Watch Party

Ballet Hispánico, the nation's renowned Latinx dance organization, recognized this year as one of America's Cultural Treasures, continues its B Unidos Facebook Watch Party Series celebrating 50th Anniversary archival performance treasures with Caravanserai on February 24, 2021 at 6:30pm. Enjoy a company performance from the comfort of your own home, followed by a live Q&A session with Ballet Hispánico Artistic Director & CEO Eduardo Vilaro, and special guests.

 

In recognition of Black History Month, these February Watch Parties continue to highlight the contributions of Black choreographers throughout the field of dance within Ballet Hispánico's 50-year history. The 50th Anniversary Celebration continues with a series of entertaining archival repertory pieces, inviting audiences to look back at vibrant performances from the 80s and 90s with the Ballet Hispánico Watch Party Series, available at ballethispanico.org, and on YouTube and Facebook.

 

February 24, 2021 at 6:30pm

Caravanserai by Talley Beatty, followed by a conversation with Eduardo Vilaro and special guests Robert Battle, Artistic Director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater; Linda Celeste Sims, former Ballet Hispánico Company & Ailey dancer; Glenn Allen Sims, former Ailey dancer; and

Danni Gee, Dance Curator & Music Programming Associate, City Parks Foundation/SummerStage.

 

In Caravanserai, choreographer Talley Beatty uses the music of Carlos Santana in this free-floating and enigmatic reflection on time and space.  Exploring the cycle of life from birth to death, this rapturous work captures the driving movement of the forces of nature. Choreography by Talley Beatty; Restaging by Merle Holloman; Music by Carlos Santana; Costume Design by Anita Yavich; Lighting Design by Roger Morgan; Dancers: Irene Hogarth-Cimino, Natalia Alonso, Candice Monét McCall, Angelica Burgos, Jessica Batten, Min-Tzu Li, Rodney Hamilton, Waldemar Quiñones-Villanueva, Nicholas Villenueve, Jeffery Hover. 

 

"A late Talley Beatty carnival set to a Carlos Santana groove." 

- The New Yorker

 

#BUnidos

#BUnidos began as a daily video series to combat the loss of performances and community programming due to COVID-19. As social distancing continues, we continue to provide content through our social media platforms as a way to instill a sense of community within our BH familia and offer ways to explore dance and Latino cultures online. #BUnidos! "As a community of dancers, artists, and human beings, we are all in this together. We will persevere through this challenging time, and we hope that this programming provides a coping outlet, for you, for our followers and the community overall," said Eduardo Vilaro, Artistic Director & CEO of Ballet Hispánico. "Now more than ever, it is important to band together in support of the arts. The personal and professional challenges that we have already endured and will continue to face over the next few weeks or months are significant. What we can take from this time of cancellations, uncertainty and social distancing is a chance to use our creativity to connect with the community on a new level. Social distancing does not mean emotional distancing. Ballet Hispánico was founded upon and has always believed in the importance of reaching and servicing our community through dance and culture. As this pandemic occurs during our 50th Anniversary, it provides us with an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, get back to our roots by reaching out to community near and far, and look forward to what is ahead."

 

About Ballet Hispánico

Ballet Hispánico is the nation's renowned Latino dance organization and one of America's Cultural Treasures. Ballet Hispánico brings communities together to celebrate and explore Latino cultures through innovative dance performances, transformative dance training, and enduring community engagement experiences. Founded in 1970 by National Medal of Arts recipient, Tina Ramírez, the organization emerged during the post-civil rights movement on New York's Upper West Side, providing a safe haven for primarily Black and Brown Latinx youth seeking artistic sanctuary during New York City's plight in the 1970s. The need for place, both culturally and artistically, led families to find Ballet Hispánico. The focus on dance as a means to develop working artists, combined with the training, authenticity of voice, and power of representation, fueled the organization's roots and trajectory. With its strong emphasis on dance, achievement, and public presence, the organization has flourished in its three main programs: its Company, School of Dance, and Community Arts Partnerships. The organization serves as a platform for historically omitted and overlooked artists providing them with increased capacity, voice, and affirmation. Over the past five decades, by leading with Latinx culture at the forefront of performance, education, and advocacy, Ballet Hispánico's mission is a catalyst of change and possibility for communities throughout our nation.

 

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